Muslim Missionaries Ring in the New Year

SOTG 515 - Muslim Missionaries Ring in the New Year

SOTG 515 – Muslim Missionaries Ring in the New Year
(Murat Ergin/Ihlas News Agency, via Reuters)

How did you ring in the new year? Well, no one welcomes the new year like the 7th Century Death Cult. Because we know that the MSM will gloss right over these stories of Muslim Missionaries spreading the Religion of Peace, Paul will remind you how they welcome the new year.

During our Quiet Time segment from SilencerShop.com, Paul will remind you about the recommended reading list that we have compile just for you, the SOTG listener. Reading is exercise for the brain just as lifting weights is for the body. We want you to have a strong mind.

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Topics Covered During This Episode:

  • Religion of Peace
    • Migrant Stabs Christian Woman Because She Was Reading Bible
    • Terrorist Attack at Nightclub in Istanbul Kills Dozens
    • American injured in Istanbul nightclub attack was saved by his phone
  • Quiet Time brought to you by Silencer Shop – Patriot Bookshelf Reminder

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From www.breitbart.com:

An Afghan migrant attacked a woman at an asylum centre in Austria because she was reading a bible.

The attack took place in the town on Timelkam in the state of Upper Austria. The attacker was a 22-year-old migrant from Afghanistan who became annoyed that the 50-year-old woman had been invited by Christian residents to read the bible.

Austrian paper Kronen Zeitung says he ran into the kitchen where the woman was talking and attempted to stab her in her upper body. Her thick winter coat protected from serious harm, however she fell and injured her ear due the force of the blow.

Police arrived at the scene and arrested the migrant. He admitted he had overreacted, although he told police this was due to “personal problems”. He also stated that he had never seen the woman before the attack.

There have been numerous incidents of Christians coming under attack in migrant centres across Europe.

One charity said that over 700 Christians have been attacked in German asylums homes since May 2016, with the majority of perpetrators being Muslim.

Christian charity Open Doors said that 83 per cent of the cases reported included multiple assaults, while almost half of victims claim they have received death threats from fellow migrants. Another 44 said they had been sexually assaulted.

Over 90 per cent of the attackers were Muslim, and in 205 cases the attackers were not only Muslim but also guards at the centres.

Breitbart London also reported in August how an Iranian-born German politician who converted to Christianity said that Christians face ongoing persecution in migrant homes.

Mahin Mousapour said Christians in asylum centres were being told they are “impure as a dog”.

“Toys of Christian children are being destroyed, Christian asylum seekers are told not only to wash their dishes after eating but also that they must clean the entire kitchen as it would otherwise be ‘unclean’. Many Muslim asylum seekers call all Christians unclean. Church services are held in secret, bibles and crucifixes have to be hidden,” she said.

From www.nytimes.com:

At least 39 people were killed and dozens more were wounded when a single gunman attacked a crowded Istanbul nightclub about an hour after midnight on New Year’s Day, Turkish officials said.

Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu called it an act of terrorism and said the gunman was still being sought early Sunday.

Sixteen of the people killed were foreigners, the Foreign Ministry said; it was not clear if any were Americans. At least 69 people were being treated at hospitals, Mr. Soylu said.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the mass shooting, which came as threats against Turkey by the Islamic State and its supporters have increased. It was the fourth terrorist attack in Turkey in less than a month.

This one started about 1:15 a.m. at the Reina nightclub, which overlooks the Bosporus and is known for its celebrity clientele and is popular among foreigners. As many as 600 people were celebrating the New Year when a lone attacker, said to be armed with a Kalashnikov rifle, burst in, officials said.

Gov. Vasip Sahin of Istanbul Province said a police officer outside the club had been killed before the bloodshed began inside.

“One person first kills the police officer outside, and then a civilian,” Mr. Sahin said. “Inside, he rained bullets brutally, mercilessly over innocent people who were there just to celebrate the New Year and have fun.”

In the ensuing panic and the rush to escape, some clubgoers jumped into the Bosporus — which separates Europe and Asia — and others hunkered down for safety.

Sinem Uyanik, who was there with her husband, Lutfu Uyanik, told The Associated Press that she had seen several bodies inside the club. Her husband was wounded, she added, but not seriously.

“Before I could understand what was happening, my husband fell on top me,” she said. “I had to lift several bodies from on top of me before I could get out.”

A wounded man on a stretcher told the independent Turkish news agency DHA that the attacker had “put a bullet to the head of anyone alive.”

Television footage showed dozens of ambulances rushing to the scene and people fleeing, some walking with difficulty, arm in arm.

The owner of Reina, Mehmet Kocarslan, told the Hurriyet news site that security measures had been beefed up over the past 10 days after American intelligence officials had warned about an attack in Turkey over the holidays.

The shooting came just days after the Nashir Media Foundation, a group identified by experts as being pro-Islamic State, published the last of three messages calling on individual attackers in the West to turn the holiday season into days of “terror and blood.” It urged attacks on clubs, markets and movie theaters.

Nashir Media singled out Turkey in its threats. “Attack the embassies and consulates of Turkey and all coalition countries where you are,” the message said.

“Turn their happiness and joy into grieves,” it went on in garbled English, “and their feasts into funerals.”

In addition, there have been numerous official threats by the Islamic State, including from its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who in his most recent speech called for attacks against Turkey.

On Dec. 22, the United States government issued a statement that extremist groups were “continuing aggressive efforts to conduct attacks throughout Turkey” in areas where American citizens and expatriates lived or visited. The statement urged caution about being in crowded places and public gatherings during the holidays.

The Turkish prime minister, Binali Yildirim, immediately cracked down on news coverage of the attack. He directed news outlets to await official government updates. He invoked a law that casts reporting on such attacks as supporting terrorists.

A White House official said President Obama had been briefed by his national security advisers about the nightclub attack. Mr. Obama expressed his condolences and offered assistance to the Turkish authorities.

Ned Price, a spokesman for the National Security Council, condemned the attack in a statement and said the savagery of the attack was underscored by how “innocent revelers” had been targeted.

“We reaffirm the support of the United States for Turkey, our NATO ally, in our shared determination to confront and defeat all forms of terrorism,” he said.

Turkey is still recovering from a coup attempt that began on July 15 in which at least 265 people were killed.

Though the effort sputtered in a matter of hours, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan responded with a monthslong crackdown targeting dissidents across Turkish society. In addition to arresting thousands of military personnel suspected of involvement in the coup, hundreds of thousands of civil servants, educational workers and journalists have been suspended.

The coup and the assassination of Ambassador Andrey G. Karlov of Russia in Ankara on Dec. 19 raised concerns that the country’s security establishment has grown ineffective. The internal turmoil also raised doubts about how well Turkey would be able to participate in international counterterrorism efforts, especially against the Islamic State.

Since the crackdown began, protests against Mr. Erdogan have led to frequent clashes between demonstrators and the police. And reports of targeted attacks against civilians after martial law was declared in July have revived painful memories of the political violence Turkey experienced in the 1970s and 1980s.

Turkey’s struggles with security had already grown severe months before the coup attempt. A spate of suicide bombings and other attacks since 2015 was capped off by the June 28 attack on Istanbul Ataturk Airport, the country’s busiest. The attack left 45 people dead.

A Kurdish militant group claimed responsibility for a double bombing that killed 39 people and wounded 154 outside a soccer stadium in Istanbul on Dec. 10. That death toll ultimately climbed to 45.

A car bombing in central Turkey killed 13 soldiers and wounded more than 50 other members of the military on Dec. 17. Two days later, Mr. Karlov was assassinated.

From www.foxnews.com:

The lone American confirmed to have been injured in a New Year’s terror attack on an Istanbul nightclub was saved by his cell phone, his brother told local media Monday.

William Jacob Raak, 35, of Chadds Ford, Pa., was one of an estimated 600 people partying inside the Reina nightclub early on New Year’s Day when a gunman entered and opened fire at around 1:15 a.m. The attack, which was claimed by ISIS, killed at least 39 people, many of them foreigners, and injured close to 70 others.

Raak, who was at the club with a group of nine people, was shot in the hip. His brother, Michael Raak, told NBC10 that the bullet “hit his phone” before traveling to Jacob Raak’s knee.

Doctors told Raak that the cell phone prevented the bullet from hitting a major artery, likely saving the American’s life.

In an interview with NBC News, Raak said he laid on the floor of the nightclub and played dead as the gunman moved through the bloody scene. He described himself as “probably the luckiest person in the whole thing.”

“When he shot me I didn’t move — I just let him shoot me,” he said. “I was shot when I was already on the ground. He was shooting people that he had already shot.”

Seven of Raak’s companions at the club were shot. All were expected to survive.

Camera crews captured Raak being loaded onto an ambulance outside the nightclub.

“I was shot in the f—ing leg, man,” he yelled to reporters. “These crazy people came in shooting everything.”

Raak’s mother, Grace Raak, told The Associated Press on Monday her son was visiting Istanbul to celebrate his birthday, which was Wednesday.
“We are praying for those that were injured, for their speedy recovery, and we’re praying for the family and friends of those who lost loved ones,” Grace Raak said.
She said it was her understanding that her son was to arrive home Tuesday night.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said the attacker left a gun at the club and escaped by “taking advantage of the chaos” that ensued. Some customers reportedly jumped into the waters of the Bosporus strait to escape the attack.

The mass shooting followed more than 30 violent acts over the past year in Turkey, which is a member of the NATO alliance and a partner in the U.S.-led coalition fighting against ISIS in Syria and Iraq.

The country endured multiple bombings in 2016, including three in Istanbul alone that authorities blamed on ISIS, a failed coup attempt in July and renewed conflict with Kurdish rebels in the southeast.